lady dis

i’m kind of on a hobbit/lotr kick (marathoning lotr and rereading hobbit) and i was just trying to doodle a lady dwarf and it all spiraled. idk i imagine princess dis to be at once softer and harder than thorin — lacking his bluster and rage, but keeping his majesty

i think too much about dwarves, guys.

i have decided to make a collection of my favorite gifs to cheer me up. it is below. click it

Read More

"i hear her. she’s saying… she’s saying, she’s okay to go."

(I return from my art hiatus with some obscure-ass fan art that I am going to talk about here for a second. These are Ellie Arroway and Kent Clark (I know right) from Contact (1997) and it was my favorite film when I was a kid. And before I even knew what shipping was, I was pissed that Ellie ended up with Palmer Joss (Matthew McConaughey) rather than Kent (William Fitchner). I think I just thought Kent was cuter but WHO CARES. Also, Jodie Foster minus bra was oddly transfixing when I was, like, 10. Shh.)

l·o·v·[luhv]  - noun

a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection,
as for a parent, child, or friend.

(Source: pelennors)

i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 

(Source: sandandglass)

joejane19:

the good and evil list of all Andy Daly CBB characters

Good:

  • Dalton Wilcox
  • Hot Dog
  • Bill Carter
  • August Lindt
  • Patrick McMahon
  • Clive Dundee
  • Nurse Andi Callahan  

Evil: 

  • Chip Gardner
  • Gil & Golly (especially Golly)
  • Don Dimello
  • Byron Denison
  • Danny Mahoney
  • Ben Alterman
  • Cactus Tony

my little brother is a rockstar

(submission for the herschel ‘drawing on the past’ thing because i really want a bag and also i wanted an excuse to draw my little brother)

rafibomb:

unicornery:

orig gifs here

Rafi Mantzoukas on Kroll Show is a sight to behold!

sea-hag:

A post dedicated to how hot Jason Mantzoukas is in They Came Together.

rivernymph:

samwinchesterhatesfire:

quads-for-the-gods:

bellecs:

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.
Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.
People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.


she deserves to be re-blogged. 

she’s so goddamned inspirational

this makes me want to cry
rivernymph:

samwinchesterhatesfire:

quads-for-the-gods:

bellecs:

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.
Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.
People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.


she deserves to be re-blogged. 

she’s so goddamned inspirational

this makes me want to cry

rivernymph:

samwinchesterhatesfire:

quads-for-the-gods:

bellecs:

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

On the morning of September 4, 1957, fifteen-year-old Dorothy Counts set out on a harrowing path toward Harding High, where-as the first African American to attend the all-white school – she was greeted by a jeering swarm of boys who spat, threw trash, and yelled epithets at her as she entered the building.

Charlotte Observer photographer Don Sturkey captured the ugly incident on film, and in the days that followed, the searing image appeared not just in the local paper but in newspapers around the world.

People everywhere were transfixed by the girl in the photograph who stood tall, her five-foot-ten-inch frame towering nobly above the mob that trailed her. There, in black and white, was evidence of the brutality of racism, a sinister force that had led children to torment another child while adults stood by. While the images display a lot of evils: prejudice, ignorance, racism, sexism, inequality, it also captures true strength, determination, courage and inspiration.

Here she is, age 70, still absolutely elegant and poised.

she deserves to be re-blogged. 

she’s so goddamned inspirational

this makes me want to cry

(Source: cloudyskiesandcatharsis)